Les cinq défis de Gabriel (Développement personnel) (French Edition)

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In this presentation, I advance the conceptualization of the migration industry as a bastard institution. Coined by sociologist Everett Hughes, bastard institutions are chronic deviations from established institutions, which provide alternative distribution channels of goods and services. The migration industry can be conceptualized as a bastard institution in that such industry, its actors and infrastructures provide alternatives to state sanctioned mobility across international borders.

Often deemed illegal by states, the migration industry as bastard institution enjoys varying degrees of legitimacy and support from migrants, employers, migration entrepreneurs and other actors of the social field of international migration. What is the relationship between the materiality and representation of borders? Has contemporary technology fundamentally altered this relationship?

Do maps mirror or engender territories? This seminar will explore whether contemporary technological shifts impacted on the relationship between the representation and experience of borders and on the associated forms of consciousness. It will implement a trans-disciplinary perspective by bringing together human scientists historians, sociologists, anthropologists, geographers, philosophers, political scientists , hard scientists artificial intelligence, computer sciences and artists webart, hypermedia.

What do the reproduction and exploration of fictional space become if the latter is not seen as an immobile subject but through its displacements and actions in alternated realities? An increasing number of artists create situations in alternated reality negotiating simultaneously confrontations between real, virtual and fictional universes, territories and their borders.

Here physical space becomes the context for the deployment of a fictional engagement where actions, mobility of the subject and interactions with others become determinant.

Développement personnel : la règle des 5 secondes de Mel Robbins

Dynamic cartography can constitute an essential element to structure these different contexts according to situated interactions. It coordinates the geolocalisation of participants, their interactions and the fictional contents that are associated with real places in urban settings by following the scenarios and rules of games. Within games taking place in virtual worlds the mobility of players and the required equipment are determinant.

They imply situations of real, virtual and fictional immersions that interrogate the construction and limits of leisurely or institutional places. These issues will be exemplified through one or two games in virtual reality. As such, the experience of the border and passage across has been a problem, both theoretical and material, for some time. Yet now, with the increasing porousness of borders for the ever more rapid transfer of capital, we find that the physical experience and political discourse of the border have hardened exponentially. Technological advances have permitted greater securitization and surveillance regimes for these sites of passage.

In recent cinema, a number of filmmakers have crafted parallel aesthetics in an attempt to visualize the phenomenological toll and the political consequences of this border regime. Via close analysis and comparison of these works that traverse the borders of North America, Europe, and Africa, we see how border fictions intervene in the politics of fortification and exclusion.

The humanitarian protection of vulnerable migrant groups has enforced new biographical borders. Gender and sexuality have become strategic narrative repertoires through which humanitarian and biographical borders are inscribed on the bodies of migrants. It draws on real stories and real people, which are performed by actors to protect the identities of the original interviewees and mirror the inherently fictional nature of any narration of the self. By using actors to reproduce real people and real life histories, the project ultimately challenges what constitutes a credible and acceptable reality in scientific, filmic and humanitarian terms.

The fictional accounts which we inherit produce a homogeneous space that is articulated by the oppositions between the near and the far, distance and proximity, here and elsewhere. Figurations of travel, utopia, of islands or of border crossings are the incarnations of such oppositions and dynamics. But these figurations are not simply free imaginary constructions. They are generated by the media and produced by the technological and social arrangements of each era. How can we think and enact exchanges and displacements that are currently determined by information flows, while ubiquitous and autonomous mechanisms influence our capacity to reflect and act?

How does our relationship to space changes when space is framed by a complexity that overturns the way in which we understand distance or proximity? At the same time, his approach, which articulates artistic non-places and a strategy of non-localization, runs counter to the idea of site-specificity. Borders have a special significance for people who have settled in several homelands. I have carried out extensive research on this topic.

But it is not the book or my findings that will be the subject of this presentation: rather, I will describe and analyze the artistic project that has emerged in response to the book. In May in Riverside, California. Through art, much of what any book inevitably leaves out could be expressed and shared. Thus, the project opened up the project to further forms of research and new audiences. It offers an original way of generating cross-disciplinary, transnational conversations that bridge the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts. These discussions are themselves a fascinating moment in the research process which I will attempt to analyze in this presentation.

This talk focuses on the implications of new and emerging understandings of malleable boundaries for traditional constructions of borders and borderlands. Does what biology tells us about selfhood have major implications for ancient and time-honored notions of boundaries—that is, what they are and how they are maintained? Do we actually need radical categories to make sense of life as we now think we know it, or are there meaningful subaltern spaces emerging in which constructive difference can be ameliorated through various intellectual and artistic interventions?

Are we now approaching, if unknowingly, a new threshold in our understanding of the limitations in our thinking about boundaries as base-line categorical imperatives? In this talk, the meaningfulness of such questioning is playfully examined. This paper discusses biographical and participatory research undertaken at the borders of ethnography and performance art and the imagination and re-imagination of the borders between deviance and normality. Key themes addressed include the tension between human rights, human dignity and humiliation in the lived experiences of migrants, many of whom exist at the margins of the margins, and the possibilities for a radical democratic imaginary in our cultural criminological work in this area.

Research summary of the Observatory of the economic structures of capitalism. Lampedusa and the State of Exception. The Israeli-Palestinian case. The work of the OPESC is particularly interested in the structuration of international cartels throughout the twentieth century. The first part of the presentation will address the structure of the oil cartel.

It will emphasize its role in the delimitation of legitimate and illegitimate activities related to oil industries. This dynamic will then be compared to the structuration of the global opium cartel and its role in the structuring of the drug industry. The existence of highly structured global oligopolies brings out very clear boundaries between legal and illegal global trades.

The comparison between these two cases raises questions about the emergence of new industry players, which may mark the end of a historical cycle of Western control of such industries. This would lead to a strong reorganization of customs activities, particularly in Asia and Africa. Given extensive media coverage, the island of Lampedusa became a prominent symbol of undocumented mobility in the Mediterranean.

The intensification of border controls, the role of the Schengen treaty and the externalization of borders to the European ex-colonies in North Africa have been critically scrutinized. Yet, institutionalized border economies and their massive interests have largely escaped attention. The paper therefore, addresses this nascent migration industry and various actors and stakeholders.

Georg Hobmeier, member of the interdisciplinary art collective Gold extra, will present Frontiers, a game that leads to the borders of Europe. Players can also chose to play as a border patrol. The game is based on extensive research trips to the Ukraine, Slovakia, Spain and Morocco and on interviews with refugees, NGOs and authorities. It will discuss the major policy themes pushed by the US Government, namely advance cargo information submission requirements, customs risk management, non-intrusive cargo scanning equipment, and security-oriented Authorized Economic Operator AEO programmes.

This communication is based on empirical data on the public development aid projects and activities undertaken by international organizations in the area of trade regulation and standardization. It will analyze the movement of commodities through borders, especially in developing countries. The flexibility granted to goods more than to human beings is historically rooted, although it is usually presented within the contemporary intellectual framework related to globalization and development paradigms.

This flexibility is connected to wealth circulation and accumulation and the representation of abundance existing beyond the territory or the community. Economic globalization and economic integration both in Europe and North America has provided scholars with enough evidence to suggest that regional integration would lead to the end of the nation state.

In this paper, I detail the various aspects of these arguments to argue that, because borders link markets and politics, market flows are becoming a defining aspect of borders. This in turn also suggests that borders are bent, twisted, and remodeled by market flows and forces. Yet, boundaries still operate within the national territory, distinguishing people whose presence is fully legitimate from those who are only tolerated, i.

This presentation will focus on contemporary migrant workers. Their increasing mobility drives them to experience boundaries, not only during their many travels, but also in France where their working conditions and the laws supposed to protect them are specific, yet differing from the rest of the workers. This will lead us to explore the border from the inside and its use by various stakeholders. Studying the border economy has proven to be a major methodological tool to approach and understand migration controls at the Greek-Turkish border. However, beyond the methodological aspect, the border economy analysis shows how formal and informal activities constituting and surrounding migration controls are narrowly linked and contribute to isolate migrants from the local society.

This presentation provides an ethnographic account of the informal smuggling networks that helped Palestinian workers from the West Bank enter Israel between and Most of the literature that has documented this phenomenon focused primarily on the experiences and perceptions of workers condemned to precarity and clandestinity. It emphasizes their suffering or, conversely, values their ability to resist and survive in a context of increased insecurity and injustice. Without neglecting the suffering of Palestinians, I will strive to bypass these approaches. As Lila Abu Lughod pointed out, the idea of resistance tends to overestimate the power of the oppressed.

It promotes, also a binary construction of the conflict. Opposing the Israelis to the Palestinians, the concept of resistance overlooks multiple actors and intermediate interactions who actually play significant roles. Finally, by focusing only on the suffering of the Palestinians, we risk limiting the focus of analysis to Israeli power. Moving the gaze from the workers to the smugglers, I suggest here an ethnography that takes into account all the actors involved in the process. I would show how Palestinians and Israelis intervene, both formally and informally, to facilitate the passage of Palestinians workers from the West Bank to Israel.

They thus contribute to the functioning and the readjustments of the Israeli regime of mobility alongside Israeli authorities. Based on a review of development assistance projects and of trade standardization and regulation attempts carried out in international institutions, the communication will examine the passage of goods at the border, particularly in developing countries.

Although often presented in the contemporary frame of globalization and attached to the paradigms of development, the flexibility granted to the passage of goods is old, linked to the circulation and accumulation of wealth and the representation of abundance beyond the territory or the community. This research seminar will discuss the way security and technological escalation have impacted State borders over the last 20 years.

In the first workshop, the speakers will discuss the increasingly sophisticated technologies robots, drones, biometry, technosciences deployed nowadays along State borders as well as within and beyond these spaces. The socio-historical perspective adopted within the second workshop will help better grasp the processes within which this technological escalation is embedded.

Finally, the third workshop will present two trans-disciplinary works discussing the pervasive and diffuse character of border controls. Between biographies and codes, borders pervade human bodies and flows of digital data. The first decades of 21st century will be seen as the age of unmanned vehicles. Since , the use of unmanned aerial vehicles in war zones has increased dramatically.

Many of these are armed and controlled from thousands of miles away. Now this technology has proliferated to at least 76 countries and there is a massive international market.

Subaru Métropolitain

The developments have expanded to unmanned ships, submarines, cars and ground robots and they are beginning to make an appearance in the civil world with police and border protection agencies. This talk will examine the development of the technology and lead to a discussion about how it might be applied in the future border protection to keep people, keep people out or to keep people in. The governance model of the Nation-State is now competing with the management methods of financial capitalism.

The private equity market in France

A number of recent events confirm the strengthening of such trend: the appointment of Mario Monti and Loukas Papadimos in Italy and Greece, the sovereign debt crisis, etc. This redeployment of power requires to redefine and redraw the maps of these ongoing tensions by reassessing the notions of State security, border legislation, suffrage, labor law, tax, and market. This presentation intends to identify the fault lines between financial capitalism and the Nation-State and to inventory the techniques and technologies that are part of this reconfiguration.

I will start by contextualising this project by sketching in broad terms the tension between the governance of flow and the partitioning of the seas that characterises maritime governance, the broad geopolitical significance of the Mediterranean and the conditions in which the attempt to control the maritime borders of the EU operates. I will argue that despite their sophistication, these sensing technologies reach their limits when confronted will the mobility of illegalised migrants. As a matter of fact, the militarisation and technologisation of migration control at sea have revealed to be deadly — over Finally, I will describe our investigation into a particular contentious incident at sea that has allowed us to go beyond counting and denouncing the deaths of migrants at sea and demand accountability.

This presentation aims at analyzing the regulatory attempts introduced by human genetic technoscience at the world scale. Particularly, the presentation underlines the way in which instrumentalization of bioethics committees and technological assessment programs at the national, supranational or international levels favor of the normalization of the human in biological terms. In the process, borders are transformed into multiple public institutional networks arranged as polymorphic, discontinous and complementary configurations, which are created or deconstructed out of necessities and compelling needs for political legitimation.

Technologies of social control and instruments of identification instruments are governmental techniques that helped the building of the Nation-State. Anthropometry has allowed for the first time to establish scientifically the identity of offenders and to punish recidivists. These elements shaped the cornerstone of the anthropometric system. This general process of rationalization of police techniques in order to identify individuals Bertillon, fingerprinting, etc.

This intensification of technologies reflects a reorganization of modes of expressions of public authorities. It raises questions about the consequences of its search for a new efficiency and legitimacy. Indeed, this process has brought public authorities to increasingly anchor themselves within society and to rely on technological developments that blur the classical borders between security and freedom, justice and policing, repression and surveillance.

In Japanese scientists led by Furuhata Tanemoto, a professor of forensic science and later the chief of National Research Institute of Police Science, began to classify racial and ethnic groups by calculating their fingerprints. This paper conducts a historical case study of Japanese scientific research on fingerprints between the s and s in which bodies became space of bordering practices by predicting their dispositions and criminality. Spatialisation of bodies was twofold: on the one hand bodies were spatialised in a sense that physical bodily features became sphere of production of a particular identity; and on the other hand bodies were also territorialised into a geographical location and the spectrum of political powers.

Risk management strategies associated with the quest to securitize transnational mobility have triggered a technological race to embed borders into the human body. The belief is that mobile risks can be estimated from mobile bodies and efficiently eliminated along the way, so that traffic flows are not disrupted at the border. Accordingly, bodies are imagined as spaces to inscribe borders on. This logic of power has adopted a view predominant in natural sciences that sees the body as a material object that can be rendered digitally knowable with the help of technology.

Biometric technologies, among others, are used to acquire comprehensive knowledge about every mobile body even before it crosses state borders. Then, these bodily data are used to classify people in terms of good versus bad mobility in order to produce categories that are amenable to risk contingency calculus.

In this way, knowledge of the body results in power over the body. This is, at the same time, power over the most intimate and mobile of spaces. A closer examination reveals that such logic of spatial control tends to imagine border automation as panacea for reconciling unfettered mobility and territorial security.

Biometric technology is understood as a tool that would allow predicting future threats and threatening behavior. Contrary to claims that digital border technologies simply aid human decision-making, the manner in which they are implemented suggests that border automation aims to assume self decision-making capabilities that diminish human involvement in the act of bordering. The Israeli-Palestinian case. The work of the OPESC is particularly interested in the structuration of international cartels throughout the twentieth century.

The first part of the presentation will address the structure of the oil cartel. It will emphasize its role in the delimitation of legitimate and illegitimate activities related to oil industries. This dynamic will then be compared to the structuration of the global opium cartel and its role in the structuring of the drug industry. The existence of highly structured global oligopolies brings out very clear boundaries between legal and illegal global trades.

The comparison between these two cases raises questions about the emergence of new industry players, which may mark the end of a historical cycle of Western control of such industries. This would lead to a strong reorganization of customs activities, particularly in Asia and Africa. Given extensive media coverage, the island of Lampedusa became a prominent symbol of undocumented mobility in the Mediterranean. The intensification of border controls, the role of the Schengen treaty and the externalization of borders to the European ex-colonies in North Africa have been critically scrutinized.

Yet, institutionalized border economies and their massive interests have largely escaped attention. The paper therefore, addresses this nascent migration industry and various actors and stakeholders. Georg Hobmeier, member of the interdisciplinary art collective Gold extra, will present Frontiers, a game that leads to the borders of Europe. Players can also chose to play as a border patrol. The game is based on extensive research trips to the Ukraine, Slovakia, Spain and Morocco and on interviews with refugees, NGOs and authorities.

It will discuss the major policy themes pushed by the US Government, namely advance cargo information submission requirements, customs risk management, non-intrusive cargo scanning equipment, and security-oriented Authorized Economic Operator AEO programmes. This communication is based on empirical data on the public development aid projects and activities undertaken by international organizations in the area of trade regulation and standardization. It will analyze the movement of commodities through borders, especially in developing countries.

The flexibility granted to goods more than to human beings is historically rooted, although it is usually presented within the contemporary intellectual framework related to globalization and development paradigms. This flexibility is connected to wealth circulation and accumulation and the representation of abundance existing beyond the territory or the community.

Economic globalization and economic integration both in Europe and North America has provided scholars with enough evidence to suggest that regional integration would lead to the end of the nation state. In this paper, I detail the various aspects of these arguments to argue that, because borders link markets and politics, market flows are becoming a defining aspect of borders.

Nasze historie

This in turn also suggests that borders are bent, twisted, and remodeled by market flows and forces. Yet, boundaries still operate within the national territory, distinguishing people whose presence is fully legitimate from those who are only tolerated, i. This presentation will focus on contemporary migrant workers. Their increasing mobility drives them to experience boundaries, not only during their many travels, but also in France where their working conditions and the laws supposed to protect them are specific, yet differing from the rest of the workers.

This will lead us to explore the border from the inside and its use by various stakeholders. Studying the border economy has proven to be a major methodological tool to approach and understand migration controls at the Greek-Turkish border. However, beyond the methodological aspect, the border economy analysis shows how formal and informal activities constituting and surrounding migration controls are narrowly linked and contribute to isolate migrants from the local society.

This presentation provides an ethnographic account of the informal smuggling networks that helped Palestinian workers from the West Bank enter Israel between and Most of the literature that has documented this phenomenon focused primarily on the experiences and perceptions of workers condemned to precarity and clandestinity. It emphasizes their suffering or, conversely, values their ability to resist and survive in a context of increased insecurity and injustice.

Without neglecting the suffering of Palestinians, I will strive to bypass these approaches. As Lila Abu Lughod pointed out, the idea of resistance tends to overestimate the power of the oppressed. It promotes, also a binary construction of the conflict. Opposing the Israelis to the Palestinians, the concept of resistance overlooks multiple actors and intermediate interactions who actually play significant roles.

Finally, by focusing only on the suffering of the Palestinians, we risk limiting the focus of analysis to Israeli power. Moving the gaze from the workers to the smugglers, I suggest here an ethnography that takes into account all the actors involved in the process. I would show how Palestinians and Israelis intervene, both formally and informally, to facilitate the passage of Palestinians workers from the West Bank to Israel.

They thus contribute to the functioning and the readjustments of the Israeli regime of mobility alongside Israeli authorities. Based on a review of development assistance projects and of trade standardization and regulation attempts carried out in international institutions, the communication will examine the passage of goods at the border, particularly in developing countries. Although often presented in the contemporary frame of globalization and attached to the paradigms of development, the flexibility granted to the passage of goods is old, linked to the circulation and accumulation of wealth and the representation of abundance beyond the territory or the community.

This research seminar will discuss the way security and technological escalation have impacted State borders over the last 20 years. In the first workshop, the speakers will discuss the increasingly sophisticated technologies robots, drones, biometry, technosciences deployed nowadays along State borders as well as within and beyond these spaces.

The socio-historical perspective adopted within the second workshop will help better grasp the processes within which this technological escalation is embedded. Finally, the third workshop will present two trans-disciplinary works discussing the pervasive and diffuse character of border controls. Between biographies and codes, borders pervade human bodies and flows of digital data.

The first decades of 21st century will be seen as the age of unmanned vehicles. Since , the use of unmanned aerial vehicles in war zones has increased dramatically. Many of these are armed and controlled from thousands of miles away. Now this technology has proliferated to at least 76 countries and there is a massive international market. The developments have expanded to unmanned ships, submarines, cars and ground robots and they are beginning to make an appearance in the civil world with police and border protection agencies.

This talk will examine the development of the technology and lead to a discussion about how it might be applied in the future border protection to keep people, keep people out or to keep people in. The governance model of the Nation-State is now competing with the management methods of financial capitalism. A number of recent events confirm the strengthening of such trend: the appointment of Mario Monti and Loukas Papadimos in Italy and Greece, the sovereign debt crisis, etc.

IHPE – équipe EcoEvI (Ecologie et Evolution des Interactions) |

This redeployment of power requires to redefine and redraw the maps of these ongoing tensions by reassessing the notions of State security, border legislation, suffrage, labor law, tax, and market. This presentation intends to identify the fault lines between financial capitalism and the Nation-State and to inventory the techniques and technologies that are part of this reconfiguration.

I will start by contextualising this project by sketching in broad terms the tension between the governance of flow and the partitioning of the seas that characterises maritime governance, the broad geopolitical significance of the Mediterranean and the conditions in which the attempt to control the maritime borders of the EU operates. I will argue that despite their sophistication, these sensing technologies reach their limits when confronted will the mobility of illegalised migrants.

Texte intégral

As a matter of fact, the militarisation and technologisation of migration control at sea have revealed to be deadly — over Finally, I will describe our investigation into a particular contentious incident at sea that has allowed us to go beyond counting and denouncing the deaths of migrants at sea and demand accountability. This presentation aims at analyzing the regulatory attempts introduced by human genetic technoscience at the world scale. Particularly, the presentation underlines the way in which instrumentalization of bioethics committees and technological assessment programs at the national, supranational or international levels favor of the normalization of the human in biological terms.

In the process, borders are transformed into multiple public institutional networks arranged as polymorphic, discontinous and complementary configurations, which are created or deconstructed out of necessities and compelling needs for political legitimation.

Technologies of social control and instruments of identification instruments are governmental techniques that helped the building of the Nation-State. Anthropometry has allowed for the first time to establish scientifically the identity of offenders and to punish recidivists. These elements shaped the cornerstone of the anthropometric system. This general process of rationalization of police techniques in order to identify individuals Bertillon, fingerprinting, etc.

This intensification of technologies reflects a reorganization of modes of expressions of public authorities. It raises questions about the consequences of its search for a new efficiency and legitimacy. Indeed, this process has brought public authorities to increasingly anchor themselves within society and to rely on technological developments that blur the classical borders between security and freedom, justice and policing, repression and surveillance. In Japanese scientists led by Furuhata Tanemoto, a professor of forensic science and later the chief of National Research Institute of Police Science, began to classify racial and ethnic groups by calculating their fingerprints.

This paper conducts a historical case study of Japanese scientific research on fingerprints between the s and s in which bodies became space of bordering practices by predicting their dispositions and criminality. Spatialisation of bodies was twofold: on the one hand bodies were spatialised in a sense that physical bodily features became sphere of production of a particular identity; and on the other hand bodies were also territorialised into a geographical location and the spectrum of political powers. Risk management strategies associated with the quest to securitize transnational mobility have triggered a technological race to embed borders into the human body.

The belief is that mobile risks can be estimated from mobile bodies and efficiently eliminated along the way, so that traffic flows are not disrupted at the border. Accordingly, bodies are imagined as spaces to inscribe borders on. This logic of power has adopted a view predominant in natural sciences that sees the body as a material object that can be rendered digitally knowable with the help of technology. Biometric technologies, among others, are used to acquire comprehensive knowledge about every mobile body even before it crosses state borders. Then, these bodily data are used to classify people in terms of good versus bad mobility in order to produce categories that are amenable to risk contingency calculus.


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In this way, knowledge of the body results in power over the body. This is, at the same time, power over the most intimate and mobile of spaces. A closer examination reveals that such logic of spatial control tends to imagine border automation as panacea for reconciling unfettered mobility and territorial security. Biometric technology is understood as a tool that would allow predicting future threats and threatening behavior. Contrary to claims that digital border technologies simply aid human decision-making, the manner in which they are implemented suggests that border automation aims to assume self decision-making capabilities that diminish human involvement in the act of bordering.

In this context, it is important to understand if biometric bordering can reduce uncertainty to make life more secure or if it is creating more uncertainty making life more precarious. The 18th and 19th centuries were disciplinary eras where societies implemented a type of power, a set of instruments, techniques, procedures, levels of application, and technologies that were anti nomadic.

This is a time when a type of power, and technique allows the body to become a password in a coded flow, allowing access to mobility and status. In the meantime security which was traditionally conceived as mono-sectoral and focused on the military, is now multi-sectoral. This suggests the importance of thinking clearly about the balance between sectors, types of threats, actors and elements, which together have important implications for security policies.

Security policies are more complex, because issues identified as security threats are also more diverse; they are plural and multi-faceted in nature. Border security policies struggle with these new complex dimensions of security. Indeed, this new complexity is reflected in various uneven ways in state border and borderland policy and affects their neighborly and international relations.

This increased complexity in security matters also has consequences for definitions of borders and borderlands — it is the border here, there, everywhere. The Texas Border and AZ: move and get shot are two net-based artworks which explore the phenomenon of surveillance on the internet carried out by civilians on the border between Mexico and the US. Many of these online platforms appeared during the rise of the social networking service whose structure was adopted as a cheaper and more efficient alternative way to monitor the border.

Thus, the recreational activity became a tool for militarizing the civil society. This talk will expose the research process behind the two artworks and will analyze the evolution of some of these net based platforms from its inception to the present. Because of the increasingly restrictive policies framing global migrations, the granting of asylum and the social protection of vulnerable migrant groups have become new biographical borders between the West and the Rest of the world.

Within the humanitarian governance of migration, gender and sexuality have become strategic narrative repertoires through which hierarchies of belonging and barriers to mobility are reinforced. Emborders assembles the narratives of victimhood and emancipation they perform in the context of original research interviews and ethnographic observations. Pictures are moments captured, shared, modified in the circulation of information flow. Thus they contribute to form the very substance of our everyday experience, not only as objects that we encounter and convey meaning, but as the changing reality of the environment in which we find ourselves.

Hence, the place of images has been modified as well as the relationship between images to places. The main issue at stake is no longer only the separation between the image of the world and the world of images, but that many ways in which the interpenetration of the world and images occurs.

This new position of the image is related to the way one can think of the space of information flows. For a long time cyberspace was thought as a second sphere in which one could immerge oneself; a world without borders that was be deployed beyond the geographical space, or in which the forms of separation and closure were of a different nature. It must be noted that what is currently happening is significantly different. It is the relationship between image and immersion and pervasion that will be discussed in this talk.

This research seminar will revolve around three axes: a review of the discussions we have developed during our program in ; the presentation of transdisciplinary approaches of border; and finaly, the preparation of the art-science exhibition, the antiAtlas of Borders that will take place at the Tapestry Museum of Aix en Provence in October The aim of this seminar is to discuss the difficulties, modalities, or impossibilities by which we can represent borders in their complexity breaking up, flexibility, punctiform, virtual, etc.

Nick Mai Presentation of Emborders: problematizing sexual humanitarianism through experimental filmmaking. What first conclusions for the renewal of border analysis can be drawn from this first year of methodological dialogues between sciences, technologies, representations and art. Altogether, the project shows that formal and experimental scientific and artistic theories, models and techniques provide useful conceptualization tools that can productively be intersected with social science analyses.

These innovative conceptualizations were presented to people involved in the control and management of borders customs authorities, government officials, security industrials or military representatives and were recognized as useful tool to discuss the practical, social, political and ethical implications of the different forms of contemporary border transformations examined in the context of the project. The contemporary increase and diversification of migration flows on a global scale coincides with the onset of humanitarian forms of governance.

Because of the increasingly restrictive policies framing global migrations, the granting of asylum and the social protection of vulnerable migrant groups have become new embodied borders between the West and the Rest of the world. Within the humanitarian governance of migration, gender and sexuality have become strategic narrative repertoires through which racialised hierarchies of belonging and barriers to mobility are reinforced.

Both groups can be targeted by sexual humanitarianism as potentia victism of sex trafficking and sexual minorty refugees respectively. Emborders assembles the narratives of victimhood and emancipation they perform in the context of original research interviews. Emborders is a scientific reconstruction of the life histories of migrants targeted by sexual humanitarianism.

It is also an artistic reflection on the inherently fictional nature of any narration of the self. By using actors to reproduce real people and real life histories, the film project ultimately challenges what constitutes a credible and acceptable reality in scientific, filmic and humanitarian terms. Heath Bunting Artist and activist, Bristol Build a new identity workshop. Heath Bunting will present the project Status, initiated in , which offers a system for the digital production of identities.

The project consists of a database containing more than 5, entries on the various elements of identification of a person. This system is available at irational. From the interconnection of all these data it produces maps representing networks and generating a social status. All of our actions and movements are traced. To take a subscription to the library, a transit card or to make a purchases online, wec onstantly fill in forms where we allow anodyne data about us: name, address, credit card number, phone … By combining all available data about a person, it is possible to assign a social status.

Status reveals how such constructions then influence our mobility within the social space online or offline. The TOM published its first cross-border map in , which made visible for the first time cross-border workers flows between France and its neighbouring countries. The presentation will show the innovative reach of such an approach, both on technical and political levels. It will also address the numerous technical difficulties that any crossborder data producer and conceiver meets in relation to both the statistical and cartographical dimensions.

This kind of approach has remained without equivalent in France or in other European countries and we will discuss the different uses and impacts of such a tool on cross border knowledge. This study also aimed to identify the main advantages and challenges of using technologies regularly in the classroom. Through a questionnaire, we surveyed 2, students from grades 3 to 11 and teachers.

The analysis of the questionnaire results shows the essential role that technologies play in fostering writing skills.